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Road Markings that Indicate Parking Restrictions

By: Simon McBride - Updated: 19 Mar 2017 | comments*Discuss
 
Road Markings That Indicate Parking Restrictions

Almost every road in the UK network has got road markings on it at some point. All road markings that instruct motorists to do something are there by law and must be obeyed. We are going to focus on those road markings that indicate parking restrictions.

When in town the most common markings are those, which indicate on where you can and cannot park. However care is needed as these markings are not the only thing to look out for, you must remember to be wary and look out for any signs in the vicinity that may instruct on how long you can park for.

Double Yellow Lines

The double yellow lines are one of the most famous road markings that indicate that parking restrictions are afoot. Double yellow lines were originally used by George Bamber in Yorkshire as boundary markers and to identify access routes to his farm when the roads were congested with other vehicles on market day.

It was on one of these market days that the local mayor saw the double yellow lines realised the potential and implemented this idea to restrict access to Masham market square on Market days.

Fined for Parking on Double Yellow Lines

Offenders who parked on the double yellow lines were fined 4d and hence the double yellow line as we know it today was born. This system is still used today of fining motorists who park on double yellow lines.

The single yellow line originated as another restriction from the double yellow line. This parking restriction indicates that parking is prohibited at specific times of the day or week but you should refer to the sign that is in the vicinity to clarify this.

Red Route Restrictions

The red route is another road marking that restricts vehicle parking and comes in two guises. It can be marked with a double red line, which means no parking at any time or it can be marked by a single red line which indicates that parking is restricted.

The red route with the single red line are normally found on busy thoroughfares in towns and cities and by law have to be kept clear usually at peak periods. The restrictions are usually signposted close to the road markings.

Keep Clear

Another road marking on the road is the familiar ‘Keep Clear’, this is usually written in bold and indicates that you must not park on this piece of tarmac or stop here when in traffic.

An area where it is forbidden to park or stop on is a yellow box junction. Fall foul of the law here and you can expect a Penalty Charge Notice if caught. You do no have to be seen by a traffic warden to get a PCN, no, many of these yellow box junctions are monitored by CCTV and therefore you will receive a PCN in the post a few days later.

A parking bay that has ‘doctor’ scribed on the road is a bay restricted for such a professional and if you park there you can be fined by your local authority.

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Bert - Your Question:
I have been trying to find out about yellow 'no waiting' lines. I seem to remember when they first came out, that a dashed yellow line meant 'no waiting during less than the working day', a single yellow line meant 'no waiting during the working day' and double yellow lines meant 'no waiting during more than the working day'. The actual period when waiting was prohibited was indicated by plates on posts at each end of the yellow lines. Similar restrictions applied to 'no loading', indicated by single, double and triple marks painted on the kerb. Can you tell me if I am imagining things? I have found that Wiki says "double yellow lines were first introduced in the UK by section 51 of the Road Traffic Act 1960 (repealed in 1972 and replaced by later legislation)", but I have looked at S51 of the RTA 1960 and found no mention of this.

Our Response:
We remember this being the case when we learnt to drive but cannot find any evidence or details of history sorry. Certainly in the 80s the Highway code was still teaching that single yellow meant a minimum of no waiting during the working day 5 days a week, double yellow referred to an entire week and broken yellow meant parking was allowed for a limited period (with times displayed on an accompanying sign).
TrafficSignsAndMeanings - 22-Mar-17 @ 12:44 PM
I have been trying to find out about yellow 'no waiting' lines.I seem to remember when they first came out, that a dashed yellow line meant 'no waiting during less than the working day', a single yellow line meant 'no waiting during the working day' and double yellow lines meant 'no waiting during more than the working day'.The actual period when waiting was prohibited was indicated by plates on posts at each end of the yellow lines.Similar restrictions applied to 'no loading', indicated by single, double and triple marks painted on the kerb.Can you tell me if I am imagining things?I have found that Wiki says "double yellow lines were first introduced in the UK by section 51 of the Road Traffic Act 1960 (repealed in 1972 and replaced by later legislation)", but I have looked at S51 of the RTA 1960 and found no mention of this.
Bert - 19-Mar-17 @ 3:31 PM
I parked on a double yellow line in non restricted residential area at the end of the kerb at around 22:00 hours, there were no signs visible and on coming out I saw a parking ticket on my car with contravention 01.
Lola - 25-Feb-17 @ 3:47 AM
I received a penalty notice for parking in a permit area. But there were no markings on the road at all ie. No dotted lines. So it should have been free parking on the street. But few metres away there was a board erected onto the wall for restricted parking. Can I appeal saying there were no markings on road?
Javed - 28-Jan-17 @ 11:56 PM
I have a keep clear box at the end of my road(T junction). It enables residents to enter the main busy road at rush hour. I was waiting to turn right. The traffic was slow moving as it was morning rush hour. The traffic moving to my left stopped and the box was clear. The traffic moving right stopped and my exit was clear. However a driver to my right had initially slowed but then speeded up and hit my front driver's bumper. The other driver moved his car very quickly as he had shunted our car back into side road. He immediately apologized and said he did not see my car or the keep clear box. The insurance company without even looking at any evidence has said it is my liability. The other driver was not paying attention to the road (possibly on phone?)and should not have entered the box as he could go no further. It seems unfair as at the scene he clearly accepted liiability. Was he liable by entering the keep clear box when clearly his exit was not clear?
Pinksister - 10-Jan-17 @ 3:06 PM
Hi, I have received a parking ticket from my local council, I was parked on double yellow lines using my Disabled badge where I have parked before over many years only this time the permit parking restrictions have been extended to another adjoining street (the street I parked in) without adding any new signs to the adjoining street, there were no- No Waiting Yellow Blips on the kerbside on these yellow lines. There is no indication from signs or the road markings that residential parking or permit parking is in force, for this road. The road lay out is a 500 meter stretch of road with parking permit warning signs on it, a right turn into a 500 meter long cul-de-sac at the top of the restricted area into another road with a different name, that does not have any road markings or signs continuing the enforcement area that starts at the entrance to the first road, the end of zone signs are on the back of the enforcement signs so they are not visible until you leave the area. recently the council has put up small signs 10 inches by 3 inches, beneath the permit signs stating that there is no exemption for disabled drivers I clearly missed these on entrance to the first road and there were no signs in the second road at all. I was merely following the rules of my Disabled badge. where I am permitted to park on double yellow lines for up to 3 hours. I stayed 15 minutes to collect goods from a shop. should I appeal, I have taken photos of my car parked where I received the ticket, and of the area where there are no road markings or signs to indicate that the permit parking area continues into the second different Named road/cul-de-sac.
oojimmyflip - 22-Jul-15 @ 1:41 PM
@Ianca. Take photos of all the signage. Send a letter with all the information you have, particularly that which suggests no parking Mon-Fri. This would suggest that parking is allowed at other times. Contact other people who've received a ticket and ask them how they handled it. If parking restrictions have been altered, this should be clearly indicated. Depending on the type of road, a Traffic Regulation Order (TRO) would have to have been obtained before any changes implemented.
TrafficSignsAndMeanings - 1-Jul-15 @ 12:50 PM
I am currently contesting a parking ticket for parking where I and 1000s of others have parked for years. The road has double yellows but no yellow sign confirming 'no parking at any time'. There is a post with a white sign displaying the white 'P' on blue background with a mon - fri 7.45 - 6.45 1 hour - no return within 1 hour. I parked on Saturday lunchtime for 30 minutes. No one parks in the road as the pavement is double width with a tarmac area (known originally as a 'Horse Track' ) which has been used for parking for as long as I remember (40+ years ! ) I believed I was parking legally and I am confused by what exactly the parking sign is saying. Help ! Cheers Ian
IanCa - 28-Jun-15 @ 2:16 PM
@warby. He will need to have seen you stop, for longer than normal etc. His eye witness account may be sufficient. Sometimes a photo will be taken before and after an interval of time, or a note made of time of arrival and leaving etc.
TrafficSignsAndMeanings - 7-May-15 @ 12:32 PM
For a police officer to enforce contravention of a no waiting sign and related double lines does the officer need to have observed you for a period of time so as to ensure that you had not dropped of etc? Does the officer require any proof to this effect?
warby - 30-Apr-15 @ 9:55 PM
@Mividame. It may be worth contesting but you should check with your local council first. In general parking is only permitted in designated bays, the remainder of kerbside parking is marked with yellow lines. However, you should check with your local authority as some may have slightly different interpretations. This one for example "Within each CPZ, parking is only permitted in designated parking bays, while the remainder of the kerbside space is subject to some form of parking restriction. These include double yellow lines, single yellow lines, permit parking spaces, bus stops or bays for loading, short stay parking or blue badge permit holders".
TrafficSignsAndMeanings - 30-Apr-15 @ 10:14 AM
I recently parked in a CPZ where there were no yellow lines and I wasn't ina parking bay delineated bydotted white line. I received a ticket but on checking regulations the law seems to be that there should have been yellow lines on the road to enforce the restriction. Can I successfully challenge the ticket ?
mividame - 24-Apr-15 @ 2:24 PM
@ronaldgolwing. Not sure what you mean, but if there's nothing to indicate to people (ie a post sign) that it's a "Keep Clear" then of course people will park there.
TrafficSignsAndMeanings - 16-Apr-15 @ 10:14 AM
I have a keep clear at the end of my street. When cars park there I am told by the police that it needs a post sign before they can move the cars of this space. Is this fact ?
ronaldgolwing - 15-Apr-15 @ 12:43 AM
@----------- no we don't have anything like this. Can you prove that the markings were not the same at the time of the 'offence'? Is it a private car park?
TrafficSignsAndMeanings - 16-Mar-15 @ 11:14 AM
Can you please tell me what are the legal requirement for car club bay marking. I have been issued with a parking ticket for parking in such a bay that was not clearly marked as such.But has since been marked.If it is possible could you please send an image.Thank you H W Atkins
-------------------- - 12-Mar-15 @ 10:15 AM
'Residents Parking Only Beyond This Point' is not a recognised sign under the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2002, so therefore cannot be enforced.
Signboss - 25-Feb-14 @ 11:12 AM
Question:When the Highways Department posts permanent signage at the beginning of a residential street that says: "RESIDENTS PARKING ONLY BEYOND THIS POINT", does that sign mean that only vehicles registered to residents (or visitors of residents) of that named street are entitled to park on that street? Question:If a parked vehicle is in violation of the above referenced signage,is enforcement of that Highways Department signage restriction to be carried out by the local police department?If not, by whom?
zippy - 11-Nov-13 @ 8:18 AM
re :no waiting restrictions what is the clarification for a sign that is yellow background and has no waiting Mar - Octis that 1st oct or 31st oct? Thanks Ivan
ruski - 6-Oct-11 @ 5:43 PM
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